Renga – Winds Can’t Heal (Jilly/qbit)

Harry P. Leu Gardens. Copyright Jill Lyman, al rights reserved.
Harry P. Leu Gardens, by Jilly

What the winds can’t heal
The contrails sever

Winter howls
from a wounded sky

Spliced fragments of discontent
litter the cutting room floor

Boneyard
Of the hunched and hungry

Light that has never shone
Moloch’s restless domain

Its bitter meal
usurps our Threnody

Offspring of the beatnik fringe
slice their tongues on prosody

Their teeth drowned red
from parsing wine

The young so wise
abbreviated flights in time

Dovetail earth and sky
mulled, singular, primed

Conspirators:
Jilly, qbit

Jilly’s Renga Challenge – Winds Can’t Heal
For Jilly’s December Casting Bricks

25 thoughts on “Renga – Winds Can’t Heal (Jilly/qbit)

                    1. Old family name, linked by myth (but no actual evidence) to Captian John Hawley of the Whisky Rebellion. Mostly though we thought “Anne Hawley Brett” sounded so preposterously WASP we just had to go with it.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    2. Haha! Great story! Those old family myths are wonderful – we hang on to them tightly for mooring and for posterity’s sake. Ours has us as direct descendants of Oliver Wendle Holmes, but I prefer Sherlock. Almost as good as being connected to the Whiskey Rebellion. (You need to write that one!)

                      Liked by 1 person

                    3. Alas, I have traveled too little. Flew through Denver once. I recall a marvelous collaboration from last summer that took place in Colorado; you & NoSaint. Possibly one of the funniest poems of all time.

                      Liked by 1 person

  1. Reblogged this on Jilly's and commented:
    A Collaborative Renga that qbit and I completed as part of the December Casting Bricks Challenge. It took us a week to get through it, but the outcome was worth the work! (It also plays nicely with my Wordless Wednesday post today.) Look for Jilly’s January Challenge on Friday of this week. All are welcome to join in with some collaborative poetry!

    Like

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